Home » Pub » London’s Finest Historic Pubs

London’s Finest Historic Pubs

The Nags Head

Though you may have visited many a pub named ‘The Nags Head’ odds are you haven’t been to another quite like this one. Located not far from Harrods, this obscure pub may seem rather insignificant from the outside, tucked away down a quiet mews. However, once you step inside you will be transported to what I can only imagine the public houses of old were like, filled with curiosities, portraits, pewter mugs and all sorts of bric-a-brac to boot. If you’re looking for a place to transport you on a historic trip through pub memory lane then this is place for you. Though do adhere to their no mobile phone rule, they are very serious about it.

The Nags Head
The Nags Head

The French House

Few pubs can boast more impressive ties to the Second World War than The French House in Soho, this place was used as a frequent meeting point during that time for none other than the French Resistance. Many of its members would come here to plot including General de Gaulle himself. It has made an effort to retain its connection to its ties to France to this day and still serves alcohol in French measures. Since those days of revolution, the pub has also been frequented by bohemians such as Jeffrey Bernard and Suggs from Madness fame too.

The French House
The French House

The Seven Stars

Here we have a pub which really is a piece of history, in fact, it is one of the few buildings in the area to survive the Great Fire of London, as a result it has over four centuries of history to its name. You’ll find is behind the Royal Courts of Justice and as a result it can often be found packed with the big wigs of the profession which isn’t difficult as it’s pretty small. Avoid the lunchtime and after work rush though and you can enjoy a range of real ales in a traditional pub that is steeped in history.

The Seven Stars
The Seven Stars

Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese

This pub doesn’t just have a fascinating name, it also has a remarkable layout and is something of a jewel in London’s public house crown. This place has many levels with what seems to be countless cellar bars in a labyrinth of rooms. The pub was rebuilt in 1667 after the Great Fire of London and is filled with all the character of the 17th century. If that wasn’t enough it has been visited by many of the world’s literary giants such as Samuel Johnson and of course Charles Dickens. You’ll find this marvel on Fleet Street where you can enjoy a good range of beer at a good price.

Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese
Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese

Ye Olde Mitre Tavern

Ye Olde Mitre is located in Holborn, this can be quite a tricky pub to discover but it’s worth finding if you’re looking for history too. Though the current building was constructed in 1772 there has been a pub on its grounds since the 1500s, as such it has seen many of England’s most notable visit it, including none other than Elizabeth I herself, and rumour has it that she even danced around a cherry tree that still stands there today.

Ye Olde Mitre Tavern
Ye Olde Mitre Tavern